Passover Seder

Passover, is a major Jewish spring festival, commemorating the Exodus from Egypt over 3,000 years ago. The ritual observance of this holiday centers around a special home service called the seder and a festive meal; the prohibition of leaven; and the eating of matzah. On the fifteenth day of Nisan in the Hebrew calendar, Jews gather with family and friends in the evening to read from the hagaddah, meaning “telling,” which contains the order of prayers, rituals, readings and songs for the Passover Seder.

“The LORD said to Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt,“This month is to be your beginning of months; it will be your first month of the year.Tell the whole community of Israel, ‘In the tenth day of this month they each must take a lamb for themselves according to their families–a lamb for each household.If any household is too small for a lamb, the man and his next-door neighbor are to take a lamb according to the number of people–you will make your count for the lamb according to how much each one can eat.Your lamb must be perfect, a male, one year old; you may take it from the sheep or from the goats. You must care for it until the fourteenth day of this month, and then the whole community of Israel will kill it around sundown.They will take some of the blood and put it on the two side posts and top of the doorframe of the houses where they will eat it. They will eat the meat the same night; they will eat it roasted over the fire with bread made without yeast and with bitter herbs. Do not eat it raw or boiled in water, but roast it over the fire with its head, its legs, and its entrails. You must leave nothing until morning, but you must burn with fire whatever remains of it until morning. This is how you are to eat it–dressed to travel, your sandals on your feet, and your staff in your hand. You are to eat it in haste. It is the LORD’S Passover.”

(Exodus 12:1-11NET)